PAST NETWORK EVENTS

Friday, February 24, 2017, 10 am - 4 pm

Master class

"The Printed Image in 18th- and 19th-Century London" Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings and Paintings, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University and Hope Saska, Curator of Collections and Exhibitions, CUAM

Friday, September 22, 2017, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

Ann Carlos, Professor of Economics, University of Colorado Boulder

"Gender Parity in Dishonesty:  Women and the Land Tax 1720 and 1725" (with Laura Wreschnig)  

This paper uses Land Tax records and shareholder records to examine the intersection of property and financial asset ownership, particularly among women, in Georgian England. The Land Tax records are for the City of London for the years 1720 and 1725, and the shareholder records come the South Sea Annuities records, the Royal African Company, The Bank of England, and the East India Company. These data also allow us to add to the understanding of how women and men responded to the changes in tax valuation that began in the late seventeenth century. We matched the shareholder records to the Land Tax records to get the number of individuals, both men and women, who held stocks in the joint stock companies and were listed as head of household by the land tax assessor. What we find is that only a small number of women who were heads of household in the City of London also owned stocks in the major joint stock companies of the time, and those that did rarely held shares of more than one company. However, the women who can be matched between records were not necessarily wealthier than the average female head of household. This suggests that stock ownership and property were held by women of moderate as well as extreme wealth. In addition, there is substantial evidence that a large portion of the women who held both taxes and property did not disclose their stock when asked to describe their personal wealth. This discovery stands in contrast to the previous literature on gender differences in risk taking and criminal behavior, which suggests that women are more risk averse and less prone to criminal behavior than men. In this data we find that women were as likely, if not more in some wards, to evade paying their true tax burden as male heads of household with stock.

Friday, October 13, 2017, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

Bradford Mudge, Professor of English, University of Colorado Denver

“Face Value: Towards a Rhetoric of Eighteenth-Century English Portraiture”

 

Beginning with an informal explanation of the origins my project, this presentation will first review key arguments and orient listeners to scope and subject matter.  Specifically, it will review how the eighteenth-century portrait has been traditionally considered and what advantages might ensue from a significantly expanded field of inquiry.  It will also explain one of the book’s central premises—that portraits should be considered a kind of money and money a kind of portrait—and how that premise allows art history to think of portraiture less as an organized collection of objects and more as a dynamic network of exchange subject to its own evolutionary forces and evidencing its own, and occasionally very different, rhetorical modes.  This brief orientation will be followed by a more formal reading of the opening section of my second chapter, “Likeness and the Currencies of Value.”  That section will include a brief treatment of the three dominant types of public sculpture in England at mid-century:  the funereal, the civic, and the antique.

 

Friday, October 27, 2017, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

Deven Marie Parker, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of English, University of Colorado Boulder

“Failure to Communicate: The Visual Telegraph in Print and Practice”

 

At the end of the eighteenth century, the British government allocated massive amounts of time and money to improving communication and transportation infrastructure, culminating in the expanded Post Office, highways, and other advances that David Harvey, Paul Virilio, and others have argued led to the rapid acceleration of everyday life. In contrast, my paper looks at an important moment of failure that such narratives of technological progress tend to forget: Britain's flawed implementation of the sempahore or visual telegraph in 1794. First, I trace the pamphlet war between French and British nationalist writers that gave rise to the invention in Britain while the nations were at war, showing how British officials intentionally sought a design for the device that differed from the French. Even when the British telegraph proved unreliable and faulty, especially compared to the highly effective French version, government propaganda touted it as a revolutionary form of communication that promised to unite the nation against foreign powers. Next, I examine depictions of the telegraph in popular British plays and songs--including John Dent's 1795 play performed at Covent Garden, The Telegraph; Or, A New Way of Knowing Things--to show how these literary representations exposed and mocked the failings and empty promises of the government's new tool for communication. I argue that these works resist and subvert the nationalist agenda behind the visual telegraph, depicting it as a surveillance tool through which the government sought to police language rather than communicate information. 

Friday, November 10, 2017, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

Aparna Gollapudi, Associate Professor, Department of English, Colorado State University

“Where Have All the Children Gone? The (as yet) Invisible Child-Actor on the Eighteenth-Century Stage

 

Child actors were a common sight on the eighteenth century stage. They played a range of roles in the theatre, from silent pages in tragic heroes’ equipages or singer/dancers in musical entertainments between acts to important roles such as Tom Thumb in Fielding’s farce and Byron’s son in the adaptation of Southerne’s tragedy, Isabella (in which Siddons memorably played the eponymous role). However, unlike the trend in nineteenth-century theatre scholarship, the pervasive presence of children on the eighteenth century stage has as yet received scant attention. What were the behavioral or artistic expectations that the audience had of them? To what extent is their presence on stage a reinforcement of child-adult hierarchies, and how might it subvert those power dynamics? The child on stage also offers a corrective to the primary approach to childhood in the eighteenth century as a pedagogical subject or Lockean tabula rasa. Child performers, often highly accomplished and talented, were fêted entertainers rather than mere blank slates. These children – in addition to those middling class ones toward whom all the eighteenth-century arsenal of emergent pedagogies and children’s literature was focused – were an important part of the cultural landscape and need to be returned to it. Also, focusing on the child on stage as child on stage can enrich and complicate readings of canonical drama. 

So, broadly speaking, I'm considering a study of who the most well-known children on the stage were, how they were perceived by the audience as well as the culture at large, and how their physical presence as performing bodies communicated dramatic meaning.

 

Friday, April 13, 2018, 2 - 3 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

John Stevenson, Professor of English, CU Boulder

"Twenty-eight Days Later: Elizabeth Canning and the Problem of Implausible Narrative"

 

The “most famous criminal mystery of the eighteenth century” (DNB) concerned Elizabeth Canning, an 18-year old servant, who disappeared on the evening of New Year’s Day 1753. She did not return until 28 days later, in a frightening condition, almost naked and emaciated and perilously exhausted—near death, it seemed.  Where had she been and how had she come to be in such a terrible condition?  Simple questions, but ones that have never been satisfactorily answered.

     Her story, the one she told her family, was that she had been assaulted by two men, who robbed her, and then dragged her to a village north of London, where an old gypsy (as her supposed tormentor was invariably called) attempted to recruit her to become a prostitute; when Canning refused, the woman locked her up in an attic room with some bread and water.  She remained there, she said, until January 29 when, her bread and water gone, she broke out a window and somehow walked the long eleven miles home.

     Almost from the outset, there was vigorous debate about her story. Was she a victim, as she claimed, or had she made it all up as a cover-up for some kind of misbehavior? All London debated her innocence or guilt for almost a year and a half, culminating in her conviction for perjury and exile to America. She lived another twenty years, and never changed her story.

     The case has been much written about for two and a half centuries, but almost all of that work attempts to “solve” the mystery—was she a liar or not.  My approach is different:  I will examine the role of the nascent mass media in stoking the fires of the controversy and pitting the two sides against each other; more importantly, I will look at this case as a powerful instance of how narrative plausibility alone became legal evidence.  She was convicted, both by her media critics and in court, because enough people, including the jury, thought that her story was unbelievable, even though another “true” story was never discovered.  Implausibility alone made her guilty and sent her into exile.

 

Friday, February 16, 2018, 4 – 5:30 p.m., CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, NEW BOOK R&R (Reading & Reception) SERIES

Jillian Porter, Assistant Professor, German and Slavic Languages and Literatures, CU Boulder, introduced her recently published Economies of Feeling: Russian Literature under Nicholas I (Northwestern University Press, 2017).

Jillian Porter holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures from the University of California, Berkeley, and a B.A. in Liberal Arts from Sarah Lawrence College. Her research explores intersections between Russian economic history and cultural production from the late 18th century to the present. Her first book, Economies of Feeling: Russian Literature under Nicholas I, was recently released by Northwestern University Press. In it Porter offers new explanations for the fantastical plots of mad or blocked ambition that helped set the 19th-century Russian prose tradition in motion. She compares the conceptual history of social ambition in post-Napoleonic France and post-Decembrist Russia and argues that the dissonance between foreign and domestic understandings of this economic passion shaped the literature of Nicholas I’s reign (1825–1855).
 

Porter is currently at work on a second manuscript, entitled The Art of the Queue: Bodies in Wait from the Revolution to the Post-Soviet Era. This book explores standing in line as a paradigmatic experience of Soviet everyday life and a generator of aesthetic forms. Porter was awarded a 2015-16 Postdoctoral Fellowship at Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies in support of the project, and she was interviewed about it on the Davis Center's podcast, “The Eurasian Enigma.” An article drawn from the manuscript came out in Fall 2017 in the Slavic and East European Journal.

Thursday, March 1, 2018, 5 – 6:30 p.m. (reception at 4:30 p.m.), CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

Ryan Patrick Hanley, Marquette University, “Justice and Political Society in David Hume's Second Enquiry”

Lecture Sponsored by the Center for British & Irish Studies and the 18th- & 19th-Century Studies Network

 

Hume’s Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals tends to be regarded as a work of moral philosophy rather than political philosophy.  This is wholly justified given the principal themes of the work.  But regarding the Enquiry solely as a contribution to debates in ethics can obscure the ways in which Hume intended it to speak to central debates in political philosophy as well.  In an effort to elucidate these contributions, this lecture will focus on the two chapters of the Enquiry specifically devoted to political questions: section 3 (“Of Justice”) and section 4 (“Of Political Society”).  In so doing, it has three specific aims.  First, it aims to provide an introduction to Hume’s core substantive claims with regard to justice and political society in these chapters, focusing specifically on how Hume grounds the value of both justice and political society in considerations of utility.  Second, it will evaluate the type of political society that Hume aims to create, and examine how exactly this form of political society specifically comports with the normative moral claims that Hume advances elsewhere in the Enquiry.  Third, it will examine how Hume’s political claims in these chapters of the Enquiry comport with the evaluations of modern liberal commercial society that he sought to develop in his  other political writings, and especially in his Essays and his History of England.

 

Ryan Patrick Hanley is the Mellon Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Marquette University. Prof. Hanley received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, his M.Phil. from Cambridge University, and his Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Prior to coming to Marquette he was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University's Whitney Humanities Center. His research in the history of political philosophy focuses on the Enlightenment. He is the author of Love's Enlightenment: Rethinking Charity in Modernity (Cambridge University Press, 2016) and Adam Smith and the Character of Virtue (Cambridge University Press, 2009). His edited volumes include Adam Smith: His Life, Thought and Legacy (Princeton University Press, 2016), the Penguin Classics edition of Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments (Penguin, 2010), and with Darrin M. McMahon, The Enlightenment: Critical Concepts in History, 5 vols. (Routledge, 2010). His articles have appeared or are forthcoming in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Theory, European Journal of Political Theory, Review of Politics, Social Philosophy & Policy, History of Political Thought, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Revue internationale de philosophie, and Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie. He is also the recipient of Fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Arête Initiative, and past president of the International Adam Smith Society. He is currently completing two projects: a monograph on the political philosophy of Fénelon, and a volume of translations of Fénelon’s moral and political writings.

Friday, April 13, 2018, 2 - 3 pm, CU Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Work-in-Progress Series

John Stevenson, Professor of English, CU Boulder

"Twenty-eight Days Later: Elizabeth Canning and the Problem of Implausible Narrative"

 

The “most famous criminal mystery of the eighteenth century” (DNB) concerned Elizabeth Canning, an 18-year old servant, who disappeared on the evening of New Year’s Day 1753. She did not return until 28 days later, in a frightening condition, almost naked and emaciated and perilously exhausted—near death, it seemed.  Where had she been and how had she come to be in such a terrible condition?  Simple questions, but ones that have never been satisfactorily answered.

     Her story, the one she told her family, was that she had been assaulted by two men, who robbed her, and then dragged her to a village north of London, where an old gypsy (as her supposed tormentor was invariably called) attempted to recruit her to become a prostitute; when Canning refused, the woman locked her up in an attic room with some bread and water.  She remained there, she said, until January 29 when, her bread and water gone, she broke out a window and somehow walked the long eleven miles home.

     Almost from the outset, there was vigorous debate about her story. Was she a victim, as she claimed, or had she made it all up as a cover-up for some kind of misbehavior? All London debated her innocence or guilt for almost a year and a half, culminating in her conviction for perjury and exile to America. She lived another twenty years, and never changed her story.

     The case has been much written about for two and a half centuries, but almost all of that work attempts to “solve” the mystery—was she a liar or not.  My approach is different:  I will examine the role of the nascent mass media in stoking the fires of the controversy and pitting the two sides against each other; more importantly, I will look at this case as a powerful instance of how narrative plausibility alone became legal evidence.  She was convicted, both by her media critics and in court, because enough people, including the jury, thought that her story was unbelievable, even though another “true” story was never discovered.  Implausibility alone made her guilty and sent her into exile.

Thursday, April 26 - Saturday, April 28, 2018, CU Boulder, Inaugural Conference of the 18th- and 19th-Century Studies Network:

"New Orleans, Global City (1718 – 2018): The Long Shadow of John Law and the Mississippi Company"

See the 2018 conference webpage.

Monday, September 24, 2018, 5:30 p.m. (lecture, with reception at 5:00 pm) , CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

 

Lecture sponsored by the 18th- & 19th-Century Studies Network

 

Julia L. Abramson, Associate Professor of French & Francophone Studies, University of Oklahoma

“Doing Deals with du Pont de Nemours: Huguenot Connections, Credit, and Capital in post-Revolutionary France and America”

 

In the very first sentence of his autobiography penned while in hiding in 1792, Physiocrat, philosophe, royal functionary, diplomat, and future business dynast Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours drew attention to his Huguenot ancestry. His family, he immediately states for the edification of his children should he die, are Protestant and Norman. In subsequent pages, du Pont outlines the family diaspora from France and into England, Holland, and elsewhere. Du Pont connects this history and his own identification as Protestant to the capacity for independence of thought and action and international connections if not actually cosmopolitanism. In this way he retrospectively builds into his familial ascendancy an inheritance that legitimizes his own multifarious professional and public activities and that, via narration, reifies his familial dynasty building. Focusing on the period of P.S. du Pont’s American connections, travels, and eventual migration, the lecture sheds light on “natural” and purposefully contrived intersections of family, professional, and public practices or comportments. In this family case involving immigration, the creation of a corporate dynasty, and persistent ties to France following settlement in America, Huguenot heritage emerges as a key element to understand notions of credit and capital investment; how conceptions of family, finance, and business meld or clash; the changing relation of the individual to the state in two countries; and the evolution of opportunities for business and finance in national and international contexts. That a social if not actually religious Protestant culture was essential to the way that du Pont framed his own business activities and his conception of business relations, demands a new consideration not only of the role of religion in the political economy earlier proposed by the “secte des Économistes,” or Physiocrats, but also of the Weberian understanding developed a century later about the relationship between the Protestant outlook and the genius of capitalism.

* Friday, October 26, 2018, 2 – 3 pm, CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

 

Work-in-Progress Series (WiP) of the 18th- & 19th-Century Studies Network

Nan Goodman, Professor of English & Director of the Program in Jewish Studies,  University of Colorado Boulder

“The Jewish Apostate and the American Expatriate: Leave-Taking in the Early American Republic”

 

This essay examines Jewish apostasy--a religious disaffiliation—and expatriation--a legal and political disaffiliation--as correlative manifestations of leave-taking in the early American republic.  It reads the writings of the converted German Jew and missionary, Joseph Samuel Christian Frederick Frey, and his arch-nemesis, Tobit, on apostasy against the contemporaneous court cases, legislation, and political pamphlets on expatriation from Great Britain or America from the time of the Revolution through the War of 1812 and beyond. Using Frey’s arrival in America to investigate the political, legal, and discursive resonances between apostasy and early republican expatriation, the essay alerts us to a moment in time when ethno-cultural and civic definitions of belonging, membership, and citizenship were in tension with each other.  More specifically, it argues that understanding the ethno-cultural pull of Jewish belonging, and the accompanying sense that Jewishness, as opposed to, say, Catholicism or Protestantism, was a perpetual identity from which it seemed to be impossible to disaffiliate enriches our understanding of the cultural system in which the civic definition of citizenship in America first arose.  The essay also argues that linking Jewish identity to the concept of perpetual allegiance and reading Frey as an apostate rather than a convert helps us move away from the standard conversion narratives of Jewish assimilation to the majoritarian norm and affords an unexpected view of the ways Jews and expatriates figured in the development of citizenship in the early American republic. 

* Friday, November 9, 2018, 2 – 3 p.m., CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

Work-in-Progress Series (WiP) of the 18th- & 19th-Century Studies Network

Katherine L. Alexander, Assistant Professor of Chinese, University of Colorado Boulder

“Penitent Mothers of 19th century Chinese Anti-infanticide Literature”

 

A wealth of popularly circulating morality literature informs recent scholarship on anti-infanticide efforts in 19th century China. One major criticism scholars have made is that in these tales, horrific heavenly punishments are disproportionately visited on mothers, even though external pressures, including from the infants’ fathers, are often directly responsible for the killings. Such criticism perpetuates the characterization of Chinese women solely as victims of the traditional family system, and does not take into account tales in which infanticidal mothers are allowed to redeem themselves and their families. Drawing on portrayals of infanticide in late Qing baojuan (precious volumes), this paper examines two such tales. These versions involve women voicing their own stories, a function of the genre’s nature as oral performance-oriented text often purposefully aimed at female audiences. These tales recognize of the painful truths that induced infanticide, rather than simply condemning mothers to grisly deaths and hell. These two baojuan show how our understanding of this emotionally fraught topic requires revision as Qing moralists produced visions of heavenly justice that were much broader and more nuanced than we have heretofore acknowledged.

*18th- & 19th-Century Studies Work-in-Progress Roundtable, ​CU Boulder, Center for British & Irish Studies, Norlin Library, M549, Friday, September 13th, 2019, 12 – 2 pm

  1. Oliver Gerland, Theatre & Dance, CU Boulder, on forcible ejection in the theatre

  2. Maria Windell, English, CU Boulder, on coquetry and settler colonialism

  3. Laura Winkiel, English, CU Boulder, on the seas and the legacy of slavery

  4. Rebecca Schneider, English, CU Boulder

  5. Kieran Murphy, French & Italian, CU Boulder

  6. Carlo Caballero, College of Music, CU Boulder

  7. Juan Pablo Dabove, Spanish & Portuguese, CU Boulder

 

* Tuesday, October 1st,  4:30 pm, Lecture, CU Boulder, Center for British & Irish Studies, Norlin Library, M549 (reception at 4:10 pm), Lecture by Christopher L. Miller, Frederick Clifford Ford Professor of French & African American Studies, Yale University, “Impostors: Prosper Mérimée and the French Intercultural Hoax”

Literature in the United States is rife with intercultural, interethnic, interracial hoaxes, perpetrated through literature: fake slave narratives, Forrest Carter, Danny Santiago, J.Y. LeRoy, Margaret B. Jones. Christopher L. Miller brings the long but understudied French and Francophone tradition of literary hoaxes into dialogue with the American one, discussing French and African acts of imposture and asking: Under the universalist French Republic, what identities are available to steal? This lecture will focus on one of the French nineteenth century's greatest tricksters, Prosper Mérimée.

Bio: Christopher L. Miller is the Frederick Clifford Ford Professor of French and African American Studies at Yale University. His latest book, Impostors: Literary Hoaxes and Cultural Authenticity, was published by The University of Chicago Press in 2018.  His other publications include: The French Atlantic Triangle: Literature and Culture of the Slave Trade (2008; French translation, 2011), Nationalists and Nomads: Essays on Francophone African Literature and Culture (1998); Theories of Africans: Francophone Literature and Anthropology in Africa (1990); and Blank Darkness: Africanist Discourse in French (1985).

Sponsors: the 18th- and 19th-Century Studies Network, the Department of English, and the Department of French & Italian at CU Boulder

 

Contact: catherine.labio@colorado.edu

OTHER PAST REGIONAL EVENTS

Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women

Exhibition, CU Art Museum, University of Colorado Boulder​, February 2 - June 24, 2017

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 7 pm, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Morgan Library Event Hall

Ann Little, CSU, “The Wild East? Tales of Struggle and Survival on the Colonial Frontier"

Contact: ruth.alexander[@]colostate.edu

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 6 - 7 pm, Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, Lower Level

Marilyn Brown, CU Boulder, "Degas and New Orleans Revisited"

​Wednesday, April 5th, 2017, 1 - 2 pm, CU Boulder, Hellems 263

Yohei Igarashi, University of Connecticut, "Official Romanticism Maximized: Wordsworth and Bureaucratic Form"

"How did Wordsworth’s other career, as a civil servant specializing in stamp and legacy taxes, affect his poetry?  Wordsworth’s work as Distributor of Stamps — odes to duty of a different kind — brings into focus the evolution of Britain’s fiscal-bureaucratic infrastructure during the long eighteenth century, and raises the question of how Romantic literature might have interacted with the ubiquitous administrative media and genres generated by, and comprising, that bureaucracy.  Engaging recent interventions on literary form, the history of British taxation, Utilitarian reform, and scholarship on documents, this talk offers the notion of “bureaucratic form” as a way to think about Wordsworth’s place in, and the value of his poetic reflections on, modern norms pertaining to the efficient registering, aggregating, and interpreting of data or “particulars.” 

Sponsored by the 18/19 Graduate Student Reading Group and the Center for the Humanities and the Arts @ CU Boulder.

Contact: deven.parker[@]colorado.edu

Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 5:30 p.m., CU Boulder, Norlin Library, Center for British and Irish Studies

Kirstyn Leuner, Dartmouth College, "Digital Methodologies for Recovery and The Stainforth Library of Women's Writing"

Sponsor: Exploring Digital Humanities: A Lecture Series on Research and Pedagogy, Department of History and University Libraries, CU Boulder

Contact: Vilja.Hulden[@]colorado.edu

Thursday, May 4th, 2017, 4:30 pm, CU Boulder, Norlin Library, Center for British and Irish Studies

"Romantic Media Symposium"

Julia Carlson, University of Cincinnati, Thora Brylowe (CU Boulder) and Deven Parker (CU Boulder).

Sponsored by the 18/19 Graduate Student Reading Group

Contact: deven.parker[@]colorado.edu

Friday, September 29, 2017, 9 am - 4 pm, CU  Boulder, Museum of Natural History

“Latin America in the Context of World Literature”

Monday, October 2, 2017, 6:00 pm, CU Boulder, Macky 230

Dr. Patrick Eiden-Offe, Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung, Berlin

“The Poesy of Class: Romantic Anti-Capitalism and the Invention of the Proletariat in German Vormärz Literature And Theory”

See the October 2017 newsletter for additional information.

Thursday, October 5, 2017, 5:00 pm (reception); 5:30 pm (colloquium), University of Colorado Boulder, Center for British and Irish Studies, Norlin Library, M549. 

"Territory, Narrative, Causality: Rethinking Romanticism's Disciplinary Assumptions"

Research colloquium featuring Evan Gottlieb, Professor of English at Oregon State University, Paul Youngquist, Professor of English at CU Boulder, and Rebecca Schneider, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of English, CU Boulder

See the October newsletter for additional information, including paper titles and abstracts.

 

Related event:

Friday, October 6, 9 – 11 am, CU Boulder, Norlin Library, Mable Van Duzee room

Seminar on eco-theory with Dr. Evan Gottlieb, CU Boulder, Norlin Library, Mable Van Duzee room (Norlin 424B)

 

Dr. Gottlieb has selected the first chapter of General Ecology: The New Ecological Paradigm (2017) for the topic of his seminar. A PDF of the reading may be requested from Rebecca.Schneider@Colorado.edu. Graduate students of all fields and disciplines are invited to attend.

         

Contact: rebecca.schneider[@]colorado.edu

Thursday, December 7, 2017, 3:30 - 4:45 pm, CU Boulder, HLMA 211

Dr. Melissa Frazier, Prof. and Assoc. Dean, Sarah Lawrence College

"19th-Century Politics, Science and Figures of Speech: Dostoevsky, George Eliot and the Possibilities of Metaphor"

 

Contact: jillian.porter[@]colorado.edu

Thursday, February 15, 2018, 4:00 pm, CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

​Benjamin Kohlmann, University of Freiburg, Germany

“Towards a Literary Prehistory of the Welfare State: Writing in a Reformist Mode, 1880-1910”

This paper outlines a literary prehistory of the welfare state through readings of works by Edward Carpenter, H. G. Wells, and E. M. Forster. By focusing on the slow politics of reform, Kohlmann foregrounds a temporality of institutional change – and a mode of literary writing – that differs from the aesthetics and politics of rupture more commonly associated with the experience of modernity. The paper locates the works of Carpenter, Wells, and Forster in relation to particular moments and movements of reform, including debates about land nationalization, progressive taxation, and unemployment insurance. Building on these site-specific case studies, Kohlmann argues that literature written in the ‘reformist literary mode’ imagines the emerging institutional structures of the welfare state as deeply connected to the fabric of social life rather than as an ensemble of bureaucratic processes located outside it or detached from it. According to the reformist literary mode that crystallizes around 1900, the state isn’t just an entity to which we adjust ourselves – an institutional reality to which we reluctantly become habituated – but something that allows us to think in meaningful ways about the ends of collective life. By presenting the contours of the welfare state as an embodiment of shared ends, the works explored here also provide critical leverage on current theorizations of the welfare state in literary studies. As the late historian Tony Judt urged in Ill Fares the Land (2011): “[w]e need to learn to think the state again: we need to frame it in a language of ends, not means”. Taking up Judt’s cue, the paper will explore the resources which turn-of-the-century reformism provides for more compelling defenses of the welfare state today.

Benjamin Kohlmann is Assistant Professor of English Literature at the University of Freiburg, Germany and a visiting fellow at the University of California at Davis. He has held postdoctoral and visiting positions at Columbia University, the University of East Anglia, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He is the author of Committed Styles: Modernism, Politics, and Left-Wing Literature of the 1930s (Oxford University Press in 2014) and the editor of four volumes, including A History of 1930s British Literature (with Dr. Matthew Taunton, forthcoming from Cambridge UP in 2018); Literatures of Anti-Communism (with Dr. Matthew Taunton, as a special issue of Literature and History 2015); Edward Upward and Left-Wing Literary Culture in Britain (Ashgate, 2013); and Utopian Spaces of Modernism: British Literature and Culture, 1885-1945 (Palgrave, 2012). In addition, he has published articles in History of Political Economy, NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction, Textual Practice, PMLA, Modernism/Modernity, English Literary History, Review of English Studies, and Modern Language Notes.

Contact: janice.ho[@]colorado.edu

 

Monday, April 16, 2018, 4 p.m., CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

Dr. Kathleen Kennedy, Penn State Brandywine

“Imperial History as Told in Coconuts”  

As unlikely as it seems, the history of the coconut traces the story of global empires. This talk offers a pop history of the coconut as the first truly global commodity. By Roman times Indians traded coconuts to both China and the Roman Empire as medicine: this commerce continued throughout the Middle Ages. The Spanish brought coconuts to the eastern coasts of the New World in the late fifteenth century. While the colonial period may be known for sugar and tea, the British Empire shipped millions of tons of coconuts from India to England for rendering into everything from candles to soap. In the twentieth century the United States took a leading role in coconut history and became a pioneer in the mass production of desiccated, packaged coconut. In this way the burgeoning American empire brought tropical treats such as coconut cream pies and coconut macaroons to tables far from the beach. By the end of World War II, for Americans coconuts became the avatars for tropical island cultures around the world and were used to market everything from vacations to cocktail bars. Like a coconut, in this talk nothing is wasted, and the parts make up a surprisingly satisfying whole.

During her multi-day stay in Boulder, Dr. Kennedy will also guest lecture a graduate class co-taught by Professors Thora Brylowe and Lori Emerson titled Literary Infrastructures.  Auditors are welcome. 

Contact thora.brylowe@colorado.edu

Thursday, September 6, 2018 – Saturday, September 8, 2018

Resistance in the Spirit of Romanticism Conference, University of Colorado Boulder

​​The program and all the relevant information can be found at the conference website

Contact: romanticresistance@colorado.edu

 

​Friday, September 21, 2018, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m., CU Boulder, Norlin Library M549, Center for British and Irish Studies

Elizabeth Miller, Professor of English at UC Davis

"The ‘Metalliferous Equator’: Extraction Ecologies and Victorian Adventure Literature"


“'Extraction Ecologies' conceptualizes the literature of nineteenth-century Britain and its Empire in the context of the global extraction boom that followed from the industrialization of mining practices in the early part of the century."

Professor Miller is part of a prominent and energetic cohort of scholars at UC-Davis – a cohort that has included the poet Gary Snyder and the philosopher Tim Morton – that is in the vanguard of interdisciplinary research, teaching, and creative work on the environment.

Her scholarly interests include nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century British literature and culture, ecocriticism and environmental studies, gender studies, media studies, and radical politics. She published Slow Print: Literary Radicalism and Late Victorian Print Culture with Stanford University Press in 2013, and Framed: The New Woman Criminal in British Culture at the Fin de Siècle with University of Michigan Press in 2008. Her current book project is focused on ecology and capital and is titled “Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion, 1830s-1930s.”

 

Contact: Sue Zemka (zemka@colorado.edu)

Friday, September 21, 2018, 7 pm (reception to follow), CU Boulder, Hale 230

Shannon Lee Dawdy, Professor of Anthropology and Social Sciences at The University of Chicago

"Patina: The Political Life of Haunted Houses in New Orleans"

Why do people like old things -- antiques, heirlooms, outmoded ‘junk’, and historic houses? What roles do such objects play in our social worlds? The city of New Orleans offers a cluttered laboratory in which to explore such questions, even more so after Hurricane Katrina threated to wash away its historic character. New Orleans brands itself as an “antique city” and there have been many fights over preservation that embody its ongoing struggle to figure out how society is shaped by both positive and negative inheritances from the past. Many New Orleanians say old buildings are haunted, and are quick to share ghost stories. For some, these ghosts are harmless eccentrics. For others, they embody the trauma of slavery and the ongoing disaster of unbridled capitalism. The patina aesthetic helps people articulate a sense of community, but also express a critical nostalgia.

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder

Free and open to the public.

Contact: Douglas Bamforth (bamforth@colorado.edu

Thursday, September 27, 2018 at 5:00 pm, CU Boulder, CLRE 302 (Clare Small Arts and Sciences Building)

Lise Schreier, Professor of French in the Modern Languages Department, Fordham University

"Fashion Victims: Black Children as Fashion Accessories in Nineteenth-Century France"                          

 

"Oversized hats, hourglass silhouettes and delicate fans were not the only trademarks of nineteenth-century French fashionistas. Generations of stylish women paraded with children of color to emphasize the fairness of their own complexion. If these children were visible, they were not seen for what they really were: human beings, objectified for the pleasure of the affluent. Their story shows how black childhood became one of the most unsettling currencies of French femininity. It also shows how beauty, taste and privilege intersected lastingly, and painfully, with the ghost of slavery."

Contact: Masano Yamashita, masano.yamashita@colorado.edu

Thursday, February 7, 2019, 5 pm, 30th Athearn Lecture, Department of History, CU Boulder, Canyon Theater, Boulder Public Library - Main Branch, 1001 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80302

Andrés Reséndez, University of California, Davis

“The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Slavery in America"

Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in the Americas. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez illuminates in his myth-shattering book, The Other Slavery – which will be the subject of this year’s Athearn Lecture – it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. Indeed, Dr. Reséndez builds the incisive, original case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America. The Other Slavery is nothing less than a key missing piece of American history. For over two centuries we have fought over, abolished, and tried to come to grips with African American slavery. It is time for the West to confront an entirely separate, equally devastating enslavement we have long failed truly to see. [adapted from book jacket copy]

Andrés Reséndez is an award-winning historian and author specializing in colonial Latin America, borderlands, and the Iberian world. His most recent book, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Slavery in America (2016), won the Bancroft Prize in American History and was a finalist for a National Book Award in Nonfiction. He is also the author of several other books, including A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca.

 

February 9, 2019 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Pikes Peak Regional History Lecture Series, Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, 215 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Helen Hunt Jackson’s Literary Home,” presented by Dr. Lesley Ginsberg, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

 

Wednesday, February 27, 2019, Symposium, “Race, Knowledge and Inclusion in Colonial Latin America and the Caribbean: In the Bicentenary of the Death of Manuel del Socorro Rodríguez (1758-1819),” Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO.

 

3:00 p.m. Opening remarks. Dr. Kevin Sedeño-Guillén, Spanish and Portuguese (Colorado College)

3:15 p.m. Theorizing Habla de Negros in the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, by Dr. Nick Jones (Bucknell University)

4:00 p.m. Coffee Break.

4:10 p.m. Enlightened Criticism and Non-European Epistemologies: Vindication of the Mental Parity of the American (Author), by Dr. Kevin Sedeño-Guillén (Colorado College)

4:55 p.m. Coffee Break.

5:05 p.m. What Black Looks Like: Racial Verification and Affirmative Action in Brazil, by Professor Ruth Hill (Vanderbilt University)

5:50 p.m. Questions.

6:20 p.m. Close.

 

Ruth Hill (Vanderbilt University). Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities, Professor of Spanish. She has authored some thirty articles, and two books, Hierarchy, Commerce, and Fraud in Bourbon Spanish America (Vanderbilt, 2005) and Sceptres and Sciences in the Spains (Liverpool, 2000). E-mail: ruth.hill@vanderbilt.edu

 

Nick Jones (Bucknell University). Assistant Professor of Spanish and Africana Studies. His research agenda explores the agency, subjectivity, and performance of black diasporic identities in early modern Iberia and the Ibero-Atlantic world. He is co-editor of Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies: A Critical Anthology (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) with Cassander L. Smith and Miles P. Grier. His first solo-authored monograph, Staging Habla de Negros: Radical Performances of the African Diaspora in Early Modern Spain, will be published with Penn State University Press in 2019. He is currently at work on his second monograph that examines the role of material culture in the archival and literary history of black women in early modern Portugal and Spain. Jones has also published articles in the Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies, and Hispanic Review. E-mail: nick.jones@bucknell.edu

Kevin Sedeño-Guillén (Colorado College). Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish. His main area of expertise is the historiography of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish-American literary criticism. He is currently working to transform his dissertation, Modernidades contra-natura: crítica ilustrada, prensa periódica y cultura manuscrita en el siglo XVIII americano, into a book. E-mail: ksedenoguillen@coloradocollege.edu

Friday, March 1, 5 p.m., University of Colorado Boulder, Eaton Humanities room 135, 1610 Pleasant Street,  Boulder, CO 80302 (campus map) - The French & Italian Sadler Lecture

Stéphane Lojkine, professeur de littérature française du XVIIIe siècle à l’université d’Aix-Marseille

“Barbarity and Enlightenment”

 

The meaning of the French word barbare was deeply influenced during the Renaissance by the Humanist understanding of Barbarism as misuse of the Greek language. But it also owed much to contrasting Roman usage, which primarily referred to cruelty. Additionally, the country from which the Barbarian was supposed to come changed over time, shifting from Caria in Ionian Greece in the age of

Strabo to Germany during the Roman Empire and Migration Period, and from there to the North Africa of the Christian Middle Ages. While the representation of barbarity pervades all post-classical tragedy (especially Voltaire’s), the Enlightenment interrogates the place and status of the Barbarian in the context of Europe’s growing colonial economy, where he takes on the likeness of a fooled native (Diderot). But how may one combine the cruel tyrant of the stage with the savage of the colonies? And might the sublimity associated with the Barbarian as both Cruel and Noble Savage lead us to rethink the barbarity of the dawning age of Revolutionary Terror?

 

Sponsored by the Department of French & Italian, CU Boulder

​Contact: azarie.wurtzburg@colorado.edu

Wednesday, April 3rd, Public Talk, University of Wyoming, Berry Center Auditorium, 10th St. & E. Lewis Street, Laramie, WY, 4 pm – 5 pm, with reception to follow

Professor Ursula Martin, “Ada Lovelace (1815 – 1852): A Pioneering Computer Scientist in her Social Context”

 

Professor Ursula Martin CBE FREng FRSE, Wadham College Oxford and University of Edinburgh, is a mathematician and computer scientist who works on the history, culture and context of both disciplines.

 

Contact: Robin Hill at <Hill@uwyo.edu>